Friday, February 12, 2016

Redo
In 1759, Benjamin Franklin displayed his beliefs on giving up freedom. He, as a founding father, believed that one should take pride in their freedoms, and should never give them away. He thought of trading freedoms for safeties as an act that should never be done.
Benjamin Franklin correctly portrays that if somebody gives away freedom for privacy, they deserve neither because if someone is willing to give up one freedom, they are willing to give up many.  If somebody gives away any amount of freedom, they will give away more. They could be bullied into submission, or “like the feeling” of safety, and want more of it. One example of this lies 182 years later. When Nazi Germany took the freedoms of the people of Austria, Czechoslovakia, and other nations, governments and allies of those nations did nothing. History.co.uk says, “Germany and Italy now realised that the democracies were seeking to avoid confrontation, so both countries continued to ‘test the limits’” (History, Appeasement). Germany was able to bully the Allied nations into giving more land. The Allies gave up the freedom of trade and the people in an attempt to appease Germany. This was the wrong decision for the Allies, and they did not deserve the half year of peace they had. One could easily say that Benjamin Franklin was wrong on this matter, and that giving up some freedoms is necessary and a part of life. After 9/11, the Patriot Acts were passed. This act drastically increased the amount of surveillance systems in the US. Many Americans were happy to give up freedoms in places like airports to assure safe travels. They accepted long lines at security check-ins and full body scans. Founding father John Jay said, “Among the many objects to which a wise and free people find it necessary to direct their attention, that of providing for their safety seems to be the first,” (John Jay,  The Federalist). Freedom must be protected at all costs, including giving up small amounts of that freedom. One might argue that this minor inconvenience at airports is well worth the amount of security it gives. At first glance, it may seem that these are small freedoms traded for a stronger sense of security. But once the people give up these small freedoms what other freedoms can be taken? The government could take even more freedoms at a moment's notice. One’s photos may be saved, or one may need to submit to a pat-down. The government can’t detain anyone at any moment because of a suspicion in the name of national security. The more freedoms that willingly giving up, the more can be taken in the future. In this way, Benjamin Franklin’s beliefs can be used to support not giving up freedom to gain small amounts of safety because this will permanently result in no gain in safety and only a loss in freedom.
Works Cited
"Appeasement." HISTORY. N.p., 12 Apr. 2014. Web. 04 Feb. 2016.
Mill, John Stuart, James Madison, John Jay, John Stuart Mill, and Alexander Hamilton. American State Papers: The Federalist. Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1952. Print.

Redo

Friday, February 5, 2016

REDO
In 1759, Benjamin Franklin displayed his beliefs on giving up freedom. He, as a founding father, believed that one should take pride in their freedoms, and should never give them away. He thought of trading freedoms for safeties as cowardly.
In 1759, Benjamin Franklin displayed his beliefs on giving up freedom. He, as a founding father, believed that one should take pride in their freedoms, and should never give them away. He thought of trading freedoms for safeties as cowardly.
Benjamin Franklin correctly portrays that if somebody gives away freedom for privacy, they deserve neither.  If somebody gives away any amount of freedom, they will give away more. They could be bullied into submission, or “like the feeling” of safety, and want more of it. One example of this lies 182 years later. When Nazi Germany took the freedoms of the people of Austria, Czechoslovakia, and other nations,Governments and Allies of those nations did nothing. History.co.uk says, “Germany and Italy now realised that the democracies were seeking to avoid confrontation, so both countries continued to ‘test the limits’” (History, Appeasment). German as able to bully the Allied nations into giving more land. The Allies gave up the freedom of trade and the people in an attempt to appease Germany. This was the wrong decision for the Allies, and they did not deserve the half year of peace they had. One could easily say that Benjamin Franklin was wrong on this matter, and that giving up some freedoms is necessary and a part of life. After 9/11, the Patriot acts were passed. These acts drastically increased the amount of surveillance systems in the US. Many Americans were happy to give up freedoms in places like airports to assure safe travels. They accepted long lines at security check-ins and full body scans. “Among the many objects to which a wise and free people find it necessary to direct their attention, that of providing for their safety seems to be the first,”. (John Jay,  The Federalist) Freedom must be protected at all costs, including giving up small amounts of that freedom. One might argue that this minor inconvenience at airports is well worth the amount of security it gives. At first glance, it may seem that these are small freedoms traded for a stronger sense of security. But once we give up these small freedoms  what other freedoms can be taken? The government could take even more freedoms at a moment's notice. The photos taken of you may be saved, or you may need to submit to a pat-down. Who is to say that the government can’t detain you at any moment because of a suspicion in the name of national security? The more freedoms we are willingly giving up the more can be taken in the future. In this way, Benjamin Franklin’s quote can be used to support not giving up freedom to gain small amounts of safety.
Works Cited
"Appeasement." HISTORY. N.p., 12 Apr. 2014. Web. 04 Feb. 2016.
Mill, John Stuart, James Madison, John Jay, John Stuart Mill, and Alexander Hamilton. American State Papers: The Federalist. Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1952. Print.
REDO

Thursday, February 4, 2016

In 1759, Benjamin Franklin said “Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.” He was arguing for lower taxes that were being used for defense against possible French or Indian attacks.
Hundreds of years later, this quote is still being used, but in a different context. With Orwellian horrors coming near reality, people have started using Franklin’s quote to counter ideas of the government having total control. Taking the “new meaning” into context, this quote shows priority  of freedom over safety. If somebody gives away any amount of freedom, they will give away more. One example of this lies 182 years later. When Nazi Germany took the freedoms of the people of Austria, Czechoslovakia, and other nations,Governments and Allies of those nations did nothing. They gave up the freedom of trade and the people in an attempt to appease Germany. This was the wrong decision for the Allies, and they did not deserve the half year of peace they had. One could easily say that Benjamin Franklin was wrong on this matter, and that giving up some freedoms is necessary and a part of life. After 9/11, many Americans were happy to give up freedoms at airports to assure safe travels. They accepted long lines at security check-ins and full body scans. One might argue that this minor inconvenience at airports is well worth the amount of security it gives. At first glance, it may seem that these are small freedoms traded for a stronger sense of security. But once we give up these small freedoms  what other freedoms can be taken? The government could take even more freedoms at a moment's notice. The photos taken of you may be saved, or you may need to submit to a pat-down. Who is to say that the government can’t detain you at any moment because of a suspicion in the name of national security. The more freedoms we are willingly giving up the more can be taken in the future. In this way, Benjamin Franklin’s quote can be used to support not giving up freedom to gain small amounts of safety.

Friday, November 6, 2015

SR 4 REDO
Summary:
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, main idea
  • In Act 4 of Othello, by Shakespeare, Shakespeare demonstrates the dangers of placing too much trust in others.
  • Supporting ideas and explanations to prove main ideas
  • Throughout the book, most characters seek aid from Iago. Little do they know, Iago has ulterior motives for helping each person seeking his assistance. Roderigo, Cassio, Othello and even Desdemona go to Iago for advice. They have no reason to suspect that Iago manipulates them and pits them against one another.
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea
  • Shakespeare shows in Othello, Act 4, all characters are overtrusting in Iago.

Response:

  • Topic sentence: title, author,correctly portrays/ incorrectly portrays___(Main Idea)________ because ___________ .
  • In Act 4 of Othello, by William Shakespeare, the idea that one should never be too trusting is properly conveyed through the characters’ opinions of Iago, and the result of this trust.
  • Claim 1:
    • Set-up
    • When in doubt, all characters seek aid from Iago. Roderigo, Lodovico, Othello and Cassio all trust him. Roderigo goes to him for advice on how to court Desdemona. Othello goes to Iago for advice on what to do with Desdemona. Desdemona, after being mistreated by Othello for reasons unknown to her, also asks Iago for advice.
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (Shakespeare 1.2.13-17).“Alas, Iago, what shall I do to win my lord again?” (Shakespeare 4.2.175-176).
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim: explain quote, connect to claim
    • Desdemona goes to him second, just after her maid. Little does she know that he is responsible for her mistreatment. She shows that she truly trusts Iago. Similarly, when Roderigo went to Iago, he ended up doing hours of grunt work and got a sword in his chest as a result of following Iago’s advice.
  • Counterclaim 1: However, some may argue that it is not that people misplace their trust in Iago, but that they ask Iago the wrong questions.
  • Set-up
    • Iago is a seasoned general of war. His experience would qualify him to give tactical advice in war time.  Although he can have opinions on people’s relationships, other people should not have assumed that he would be a good advisor for their personal lives.
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation”
    • “Every day thou daff’st me with some device, Iago, and rather, as it seems to me now, keep’st from me all conveniency than suppliest me with the least advantage of hope.”(Shakespeare 4.2.1)
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim: explain quote, connect to claim
    • Roderigo is calling Iago out for regularly deceiving him in this quote, but Iago responds with more deception. Roderigo is constantly tormented and sent on wild goose chases due to Iago’s “advice”. Roderigo had originally asked Iago to help him  win over Desdemona from Othello. He was tasked with shouting at senators, engaging in combat and making a fool out of himself. If Roderigo had asked anyone different or used his own head, he may have saved himself a lot of trouble.
    • What are the strengths/ flaws of this argument? (use rebuttal progression language)
    • But it’s more complicated than that. Iago is always making himself available for advice and taking advantage of his social status. One cannot deny that Iago has great military experience, but that does not make him incapable of giving sound advice or make him the “wrong” person to talk to. People could have gone to him as a friend, but they more likely went to him because he wanted them to. Iago is manipulative and forces everyone to go to him, because he had drawn them away from each other. From the very beginning of the story, Iago tries to shape other people’s feelings and actions. For example, he wants Brabantio to be bitter towards Othello, he states, “Call up her father, Rouse him. Make after him, poison his delight, Proclaim him in the streets,” (Shakespeare, 1.1.3). Iago easily achieves Brabantio’s angry reaction. In another scene, Iago gets Cassio drunk on purpose. “If I can fasten but one cup upon him with that which he hath drunk tonight already, he'll be as full of quarrel and offense as my young mistress' dog,” (Shakespeare, 2.3.3) Iago is an evil genius who manages to manipulate other characters’ thoughts and actions to achieve his own goals.
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea
    • In Othello, through the interactions and subsequent actions between Iago and Desdemona, Roderigo, Lodovico, Othello and Cassio, Shakespeare demonstrates how misplaced, blind trust can lead to deceit and unfortunate outcomes.
SR 4 REDO

Wednesday, September 30, 2015

Summary Response Outline
Othello Act 4
Summary:
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, main idea
  • In Act 4 of Othello, by Shakespeare, Iago begins to lose control of his plans of revenge on Othello and Cassio.
  • Supporting ideas and explanations to prove main ideas
  • His plans are still unknown to other characters and he seems to be surprised by others’ reactions. For instance, When Othello said, “How shall I murder him, Iago,” (Shakespeare 4.1.188-189), Iago seemed generally surprised. He had not anticipated Othello to take his contrived proof of Cassio sleeping with Desdemona this far.  
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea
  • Iago begins to realize consequences of his actions, and his plan starts crumbling.

Response:
  • Topic sentence: title, author,correctly portrays/ incorrectly portrays___(Main Idea)________ because ___________ .
  • In act four of Othello, by William Shakespeare, the idea that one should never be too trusting is properly conveyed through the characters’ opinions of Iago.
  • Claim 1:
    • Set-up
    • When in doubt, all characters sought aid from Iago. Roderigo, Lodovico, Othello and Cassio all trust him. Desdemona, after being mistreated for reasons unknown to her by Othello, asks Iago,
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (Shakespeare 1.2.13-17).
    • “Alas, Iago, what shall I do to win my lord again?” (Shakespeare 4.2.175-176)
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim: explain quote, connect to claim
    • Although Iago was secretly responsible for her mistreatment, Desdemona had gone to him second, just after her maid.
  • Counterclaim 1: However, it is not that people were trusting, but that Iago was a convenient character.
    • Set-up
    • People asked him not because he was their most trusted advisor, but he simply was there. They probably asked other people for their opinions, but, being a good scriptwriter, Shakespeare used as few characters as possible. When Othello was thrown into an epileptic fit by Iago, then watched Cassio talk about an unknown woman (Bianca), his only reaction was,
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation”
    • “How shall I murder him, Iago,” (Shakespeare 4.1.188-189)
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim: explain quote, connect to claim
    • Othello never checked his facts, or talked to other people. He only listened to Iago. I would bet that if Othello consulted anybody before Iago, he would not believe Iago.
  • What are the strengths/ flaws of this argument? (use rebuttal progression language)
    • Not many think that Iago is untrusted but convenient, but evidence clearly states that Iago is well known and trusted.  Lodovico had trusted him from unknown reasons, probably for previous experiences. Iago has clearly never pulled a stunt of this scale before. However, characters could have consulted other people than Iago.
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea
In Othello, Shakespeare demonstrates the dangers of being over-trusting through the actions of Desdemona, Roderigo, Lodovico, Othello and Cassio and their interactions with Iago.

Thursday, September 24, 2015

Redo
Summary Response Outline

Summary:
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, main idea In Othello, by William Shakespeare, the point that people are willing to cross their moral borders for the satisfaction of revenge is brilliantly portrayed.
  • Supporting ideas and explanations to prove main ideas
  • Iago was an honest soldier driven mad by revenge on Othello, his general. Iago wanted revenge because Othello did not give him the promotion he wanted. He sought after his retribution on his general and Michael Cassio, the recipient of the promotion by turning Othello against Cassio. Iago had stripped Cassio of his rank by deceiving him to intoxicate himself, which was punishable by Othello.  
  • Concluding sentence
  • Shakespeare shows how Iago’s sinister plan is an example of someone who crossed their morality to get revenge on someone they thought had wronged them.

Response:
  • Topic sentence: title, author,correctly portrays/ incorrectly portrays__________ because ___________ .
Othello, by William Shakespeare correctly portrays how jealousy and envy can twist someone’s morality because Iago’s lust for revenge led him to intoxicate Cassio to strip him of his position.  
  • Claim 1:
    • Set-up Iago intoxicates Cassio because he knows how Cassio reacts to the effects of alcohol on his behavior.
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation”. Iago plots, knowing about Cassio’s reaction to consumption of alcohol, “If I can fasten but one cup upon him With that which he hath drunk tonight already, He’ll be as full of quarrel and offense” (Shakespeare 2.3.49-51).
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim
    • Iago had deceived his once friend, then had Rodrigo brawl him. This is a sneaky and deceptive move. Iago seems to have crossed his morals, and allowed himself to use a newfound level of deception.
Counterclaim 1: However, Iago could have been a moral-less, vile person before Cassio was appointed lieutenant by Othello.
    • Set-up In the beginning acts, Iago seems to only be seeking revenge, but it is slowly becoming apparent that he has always been sinister and evil.
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation”. Iago says to himself, ”And what's he, then says I play the villain, When this advice is free I gave and honest,”  (Shakespeare 2.3.366-367).
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim Iago is talking about himself, saying he has always played a villainous role in his life. Which would mean jealousy never impacted his life too greatly.
  • What are the strengths/ flaws of this argument?
  • Strengths: Iago has only demonstrated evil since the beginning of the tragedy
  • Flaws: Iago did have the trust of Othello for a long time, which would probably be because of his character.
  • It is understandable to see Iago as being an evil character all of his life. This would be because he, in the text, always seems sinister or evil. However, due to Othello’s trust in Iago, Iago was a much more benevolent, trustworthy person prior to his hatred of Othello.
  • Rebuttal Progression:
    • At first sight, one may think that Iago is a heartless monster.
    • One can not deny that Iago is evil, but his past states otherwise. He had gained Othello’s trust over many years of battle and comradery.
    • However, Iago may have cheated his way to earn Othello’s trust.
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea

William Shakespeare’s Othello shows how jealousy warps a person’s sense of right and wrong, which is shown by Iago being completely willing to cross all moral boundaries to get revenge.
Redo

Friday, September 18, 2015

Summary Response Outline
Andy and Hunter, Act 2
Summary:
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, main idea In Othello, by William Shakespeare, Iago is willing to discard his morals for the satisfaction of revenge.
  • Supporting ideas and explanations to prove main ideas
  • Iago was an honest soldier driven mad by revenge on Othello, his general. Iago wanted revenge because Othello did not give him the promotion he wanted. He sought after his retribution on his general and Michael Cassio, the recipient of the promotion by turning Othello against Cassio. Iago had stripped Cassio of his rank by deceiving him to intoxicate himself, which was punishable by Othello.  
  • Concluding sentence
  • Shakespeare shows how Iago’s sinister plan is an example of someone who crossed his/her morality to get revenge on someone he/she thought had wronged them.

Response:
  • Topic sentence: title, author,correctly portrays/ incorrectly portrays__________ because ___________ .
Othello, by William Shakespeare correctly portrays how jealousy and envy can twist someone’s morality because Iago’s lust for revenge led him to intoxicate Cassio to strip him of his position.  
  • Claim 1:
    • Set-up Iago intoxicates Cassio because he knows how Cassio reacts to the effects of alcohol on his behavior.
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation”. Iago plots, knowing about Cassio’s reaction to consumption of alcohol, “If I can fasten but one cup upon him With that which he hath drunk tonight already, He’ll be as full of quarrel and offense” (Shakespeare 2.3.49-51).
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim
    • Iago had heavily intoxicated Cassio, then had Roderigo provoke him to start a fight.
Counterclaim 1: However, Iago could have been a moral-less, vile person before Cassio was appointed lieutenant by Othello.
    • Set-up In the beginning acts, Iago seems to only be seeking revenge, but it is slowly becoming apparent that he has always been sinister and evil.
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation”. Iago says to himself, ”And what's he, then says I play the villain, When this advice is free I gave and honest,”  (Shakespeare 2.3.366-367).
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim Iago is talking about himself, saying he has always played a villainous role in his life. Which would mean jealousy never impacted his life too greatly.
  • What are the strengths/ flaws of this argument?
  • Strengths: Iago has only demonstrated evil since the beginning of the tragedy
  • Flaws: Iago did have the trust of Othello for a long time, which would probably be because of his character.
  • It is understandable to see Iago as being an evil character all of his life. This would be because he, in the text, always seems sinister or evil. However, due to Othello’s trust in Iago, Iago was a much more benevolent, trustworthy person prior to his hatred of Othello.
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea

William Shakespeare’s Othello shows how jealousy warps a person’s sense of right and wrong, which is shown by Iago being completely willing to cross all moral boundaries to get revenge.